Interdean: Germany apprenticeship model is the benchmark

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Written by Seun Robert-Edomi on 3 October 2014 in News
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Germany’s apprentice programme has long been lauded as a blueprint for other countries to follow, so much so that in 2012 they signed a deal with six EU nations – Spain, Greece, Portugal, Italy, Slovakia and Latvia – to introduce its model there. Interdean insists it is the best possible example of the opportunities that are available to young people from overseas

Overseas relocation specialist Interdean has praised Germany’s apprenticeship model for the way it has successfully tackled youth unemployment, as an increasing number of young foreigners head to the country looking for work.

At only 8 per cent, Germany’s youth unemployment rate is the lowest among EU countries, and many of the young and jobless from overseas have come to decide that their long-term futures are best served there. Keen to benefit from a scheme that offers not only a salary, but free German lessons, they are moving to cities like Berlin and Hamburg in large numbers.

Removing the language requirement for those wishing to apply and including mandatory lessons as part of the training instead, is behind the marked upturn in interest from foreign job-seekers The scheme, which is funded by the German government until 2016, wants to find apprentices aged between 18-35 to work in sectors as diverse as carpentry and banking.

Germany’s apprentice programme has long been lauded as a blueprint for other countries to follow, so much so that in 2012 they signed a deal with six EU nations – Spain, Greece, Portugal, Italy, Slovakia and Latvia – to introduce its model there. 

Interdean has backed the success of the German apprenticeship model and insists it is the best possible example of the opportunities that are available to young people from overseas.

A spokesman for the company said: “Germany’s apprenticeship model has already performed wonders for the youth unemployment level among its own citizens, with the lowest rate in the EU. This is in stark contrast to some other European states where the numbers of young people out of work continue to soar.

“It is no surprise Germany has come to be seen by many young foreigners as the ideal place to further their career aspirations. The scheme offers first-class training in a wide range of sectors, a salary and free lessons in the language to help facilitate long-term integration into society for those that complete their apprenticeships. This undoubtedly helps to explain why more and more people are deciding to relocate there.”

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